Tips on Surviving Hurricane Season

Tips From Industry Professionals on Surviving Real Estate During Hurricane Season

Posted on Oct 17 2017 – 5:26pm by Housecall
Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on October 17, 2017. Housecall continues to share this piece due to ongoing requests and reader interest.
 
By Liz Dominguez
As hurricane season is revving up, much of the East Coast braces for Hurricane Florence. Most residents of hurricane-prone areas expect storms to hit during this time of year, but the buyer and seller population may not be familiar with the ramifications of a hurricane that disrupts a real estate transaction.
Here’s what Orlando Regional REALTOR® Association President-Elect Lou Nimkoff and RE/MAX 200 Orlando-based REALTOR® Daniel Wilson have to say about navigating the real estate market during hurricane season:
Trust your gut.
Unfortunately, you may come across individuals that try to take advantage of vulnerable homeowners. Following a natural disaster, service “professionals” who are not qualified to perform a job may try to overcharge for a service claiming an increase in demand. If not careful, you can wind up with a botched repair that costs you thousands of dollars.
“My No. 1 piece of advice to buyers and sellers post-hurricanes is to be aware of everyone that you’re dealing with and make sure that they’re a trusted name in their industry. During times of distress, a lot of companies try and profit from those in need. For example, make sure the roofer that comes to your door knocking for business is an actual licensed and insured roofer. Better yet, look up the business and find their customer reviews online,” says Wilson.
“You need to have a home inspector take a look and make sure any work you had done was done properly,” says Nimkoff.
Have patience.  
The market was hit hard and it will take time for everything to settle down. Not all homes are back on the market after sustaining damage during the hurricanes. In a few more weeks, you could be seeing more activity. However, if you do see something you like, it will most likely sell quickly since inventory is low. If a home fits the bill, jump on it before another buyer comes along and claims it.
“I advise buyers to act on the same day the homes get listed if they’re interested, otherwise they will have a very difficult time in getting their offer accepted once there’s been a multiple offer situation. My theory is: the first agent in the door—with the best offer and continued communication with the other agent—wins!” says Wilson.
“Because it is a seller’s market and there is an unusually high number of sellers, buyers want to be able to try and attract them and negotiate with them quickly,” says Nimkoff.
Get back on the market.
If your home was damaged by the hurricanes and you are trying to sell, fix any issues as quickly as possible so you can get your home back on the market. If your home only sustained minor damage, fix any issues without withdrawing your listing. Time off the market can translate into offers that you could be missing out on. Buyers will start to come out of the woodwork after laying low in the weeks following the hurricanes.
“I have a current seller who needed to have a new roof put on because of the hurricane. We went under contract with a buyer, got insurance to approve the new roof and scheduled a professional to place the new roof on the home—all while still on track with the original closing date of just 30 days from contract to close,” says Wilson. 
“You need to make sure that your insurance values are up-to-date. If you do have a loss, you can quickly have it repaired and you don’t have to get into a fight with the insurance company. If you suffered some sort of loss, you need to repair it quickly and properly,” says Nimkoff.
Be flexible and keep the end goal in mind. 
Do remember that hurricane season can be stressful. Emotions are high for both buyers and sellers. Work together to achieve your goal while avoiding the drama.
“If you’re going to buy a house during hurricane season, talk to your landlord and say, ‘I need an extra month if I can’t move into my new house.’ Or if you’re selling your home, you have the right to delay the home you are selling so you can work out the issue because of a pending hurricane,” says Nimkoff
“It’s an awfully tight market. A thousand people a day are moving in here. Don’t get too focused [on hurricanes] that you forget about the long-term benefits. We have pretty low interest rates right now,” he adds. 

What to Expect During a Home Inspection

HOME INSP

By: HouseLogic

From finding an inspector to dealing with surprises — this is your guide to getting a house checked out.

The first thing you need to know about home inspection: You’ll feel all the feels.

There’s the excitement — the inspection could be the longest time you’re in the house, after the showing.

Right behind that comes … anxiety. What if the inspector finds something wrong? So wrong you can’t buy the house?

Then there’s impatience. Seriously, is this whole home-buying process over yet?

Not yet. But you’re close. So take a deep breath. Because the most important thing to know about home inspection: It’s just too good for you, as a buyer, to skip. Here’s why.

A Home Inspector Is Your Protector

An inspector helps you make sure a house isn’t hiding anything before you commit for the long haul. (Think about it this way: You wouldn’t even get coffee with a stranger without checking out their history.)

A home inspector identifies any reasonably discoverable problems with the house (a leaky roof, faulty plumbing, etc.). Hiring an inspector is you doing your due diligence. To find a good one (more on how to do that soon), it helps to have an understanding of what the typical home inspection entails.

An inspection is all about lists.  

Before an inspection, the home inspector will review the seller’s property disclosure statement. (Each state has its own requirements for what sellers must disclose on these forms; some have stronger requirements than others.) The statement lists any flaws the seller is aware of that could negatively affect the home’s value.

The disclosure comes in the form of an outline, covering such things as:

  • Mold
  • Pest infestation
  • Roof leaks
  • Foundation damage
  • Other problems, depending on what your state mandates.

During the inspection, an inspector has three tasks: To:

  1. Identify problems with the house
  2. Suggest fixes
  3. Estimate how much repairs might cost

He or she produces a written report, usually including photos, that details any issues with the property. This report is critical to you and your agent — it’s what you’ll use to request repairs from the seller. (We’ll get into how you’ll do that in a minute, too.)

The Inspector Won’t Check Everything

Generally, inspectors only examine houses for problems that can be seen with the naked eye. They won’t be tearing down walls or using magical X-ray vision, to find hidden faults.

Inspectors also won’t put themselves in danger. If a roof is too high or steep, for example, they won’t climb up to check for missing or damaged shingles. They’ll use binoculars to examine it instead.

They can’t predict the future, either. While an inspector can give you a rough idea of how many more years that roof will hold up, he or she can’t tell you exactly when it will need to be replaced.

Finally, home inspectors are often generalists. A basic inspection doesn’t routinely include a thorough evaluation of:

  • Swimming pools
  • Wells
  • Septic systems
  • Structural engineering work
  • The ground beneath a home
  • Fireplaces and chimneys

When it comes to wood-burning fireplaces, for instance, most inspectors will open and close dampers to make sure they’re working, check chimneys for obstructions like birds’ nests, and note if they believe there’s reason to pursue a more thorough safety inspection.

If you’re concerned about the safety of a fireplace, you can hire a certified chimney inspector for about $125 to $325 per chimney; find one through the Chimney Safety Institute of America.

Explore More Topics:

Make an Offer & Negotiate

Buy a Home: Step-by-Step

It’s Your Job to Check the Inspector

Now you’re ready to connect with someone who’s a pro at doing all of the above. Here’s where — once again — your real estate agent has your back. He or she can recommend reputable home inspectors to you.

In addition to getting recommendations (friends and relatives are handy for those, too), you can rely on online resources such as the American Society of Home Inspectors’ (ASHI) Find a Home Inspector tool, which lets you search by address, metro area, or neighborhood.

You’ll want to interview at least three inspectors before deciding whom to hire. During each chat, ask questions such as:

  • Are you licensed or certified? Inspector certifications vary, based on where you live. Not every state requires home inspectors to be licensed, and licenses can indicate different degrees of expertise. ASHI lists each state’s requirements here.
  • How long have you been in the business? Look for someone with at least five years of experience — it indicates more homes inspected.
  • How much do you charge? The average home inspection costs about $315. For condos and homes under 1,000 square feet, the average cost is $200. Homes over 2,000 square feet can run $400 or more. (Figures are according to HomeAdvisor.com.)
  • What do you check, exactly? Know what you’re getting for your money.
  • What don’t you check, specifically? Some home inspectors are more thorough than others.
  • How soon after the inspection will I receive my report? Home inspection contingencies require you to complete the inspection within a certain period of time after the offer is accepted — normally five to seven days — so you’re on a set timetable. A good home inspector will provide you with the report within 24 hours after the inspection.
  • May I see a sample report? This will help you gauge how detailed the inspector is and how he or she explains problems.

Sometimes you can find {{ start_tip 84 }}online reviews{{ end_tip}} of inspectors on sites like Angie’s List and Yelp, too, if past clients’ feedback is helpful in making your decision.

Show Up for Inspection (and Bring Your Agent)

It’s inspection day, and the honor of your — and your agent’s — presence is not required, but highly recommended. Even though you’ll receive a report summarizing the findings later on, being there gives you a chance to ask questions, and to learn the inner workings of the home.

Block out two to three hours for the inspection. The inspector will survey the property from top to bottom. This includes checking water pressure; leaks in the attic, plumbing, etc.; if door and window frames are straight (if not, it could be a sign of a structural issue); if electrical wiring is up to code; if smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are working; if appliances work properly. Outside, he or she will look at things like siding, fencing, and {{ start_tip 85 }}drainage.{{ end_tip }}

The inspector might also be able to check for termites, asbestos, lead paint, or radon. Because these tests involve more legwork and can require special certification, they come at an additional charge.

Get Ready to Negotiate

Once you receive the inspector’s report, review it with your agent.

Legally, sellers are required to make certain repairs. These can vary depending on location. Most sales contracts require the seller to fix:

  • Structural defects
  • Building code violations
  • Safety issues

Most home repairs, however, are negotiable. Be prepared to pick your battles: Minor issues, like a cracked switchplate or loose kitchen faucet, are easy and cheap to fix on your own. You don’t want to start nickel-and-diming the seller.

If there are major issues with the house, your agent can submit a formal request for repairs that includes a copy of the inspection report. Repair requests should be as specific as possible. For instance: Instead of saying “repair broken windows,” a request should say “replace broken window glass in master bathroom.”

  • If the seller agrees to make all of your repair requests: He or she must provide you with invoices from a licensed contractor stating that the repairs were made. Then it’s full steam ahead toward the sale.
  • If the seller responds to your repair requests with a counteroffer: He or she will state which repairs (or credits at closing) he or she is willing to make. The ball is in your court to either agree, counter the seller’s counteroffer, or void the transaction.

At the end of the day, remember to check in with yourself to see how you’re feeling about all of this. You need to be realistic about how much repair work you’d be taking on. At this point in the sale, there’s a lot of pressure from all parties to move into the close. But if you don’t feel comfortable, speak up.

The most important things to remember during the home inspection? Trust your inspector, trust your gut, and lean on your agent — they likely have a lot of experience to support your decision-making.

That’s something to feel good about.

8 Simple Rules for Negotiating Your Offer and Getting That House

By: HouseLogic

Published: February 27, 2018

house

You and your agent are going to use everything you’ve learned to seal the deal.

Here’s the dream: Your offer is perfect, you don’t need to negotiate, and you can spend the next few weeks addressing more pressing home-ownership questions, like “Why is it called wainscoting?” and “Do I want a new couch in blush or emerald green?”

And it could happen. Many sellers accept the best offer they receive, and for a variety of reasons.

But sellers are also known to reject offers for a variety of reasons. Or make counteroffers. This is especially likely if you bid low, or when you’re up against multiple competing offers.

If you do receive a counteroffer, it’s up to you to decide whether you want to accept the new contract, negotiate the terms, or walk away.

In cases such as these, look to your agent. He or she is your spirit guide. If you decide you want to negotiate — that is, make a counteroffer to the seller’s counteroffer — your agent will use their negotiating skills to help get you the best deal. This is what agents do every day.

But you’re not just going to sit there. If you understand what negotiating tactics your agent may deploy — they depend on the local market and your position — you can back them up. And cheer them on.

Here are eight rules every buyer should know before they — and their agent — start negotiating:

#1 Act Fast — Like, Now

When you receive a counteroffer, you should respond quickly — ideally within 24 hours. The longer you wait, the more space you leave for another buyer to swoop in and nab the property. Also? If a seller senses hesitation, they may decide to withdraw their counteroffer before you even have a chance to respond.

#2 Raise Your Price (Within Reason)

While you obviously don’t want to overpay for a house, you may have to up the ante — especially if you initially made a lowball offer. Lean on your agent’s expertise to determine how much money you should add to the {{ start_tip 83 }}sales price{{ end_tip }} to make it more enticing to the seller.

Then, through their powers of persuasion, your agent can make the counteroffer look even more attractive by pointing out similarly priced “comps” — recently sold homes in your area that are comparable in terms of square footage and features.

As your agent negotiates, it can feel like things are escalating quickly. It’s stressful. You may feel a sudden urge to do whatever it takes to win.

Before you go overboard, there are two things you must keep in mind:

  1. You can’t exceed the monetary confines of the pre-approved mortgage you received from your lender.
  2. You shouldn’t overextend your budget.

Because your counteroffer has to be an amount you’re comfortable spending on a home. You want that new house and to keep living your life. Plus: You’re not out of options yet.

Explore More Topics:

Make an Offer & Negotiate

Buy a Home: Step-by-Step

#3 Increase Your Earnest Money Deposit

Increasing your earnest money deposit (EMD) — the sum of money you put down to prove to the seller you’re serious (i.e., “earnest”) about buying the house — is another way to show the seller you have more skin in the game. A standard EMD is typically 1% to 3% of the sales price of the home. Making a counteroffer with a 3% to 4% deposit could be what you need to persuade the seller to side with you.

#4 Demonstrate Patience About Taking Possession

Depending on the seller’s timetable, changing your proposed possession date — the date you take over the property — could butter them up, too. If the seller wants to stay in the home for a few days after closing, try offering a later possession date. You could also draw up a “rent-back” agreement, meaning the seller pays you rent for staying in the home for a set period of time after the closing date.

#5 Let Go of a Few Contingencies — With Care

Want to give your counteroffer an even bigger boost?

Reduce the number of contingencies you’re asking for. It’s your way of saying, “Hey, look, I have fewer ways to back out,” which gives the seller more reassurance that the deal will close.

But be selective: Some contingencies are too important to give up. A home-inspection contingency — the right to have a home inspection and request repairs — gives you an out if you spot major problems with the home (and protects you from buying a total money pit).

You might waive a termite inspection if you’re in a state where the risk is lower.

But ultimately, waiving contingencies depends on your market, your loan program requirements, your risk tolerance, and the circumstances of the house in question. And if you waive contingencies and then you find a problem, the seller isn’t responsible for fixing it.

#6 Ask for Fewer Concessions

At a mortgage settlement, home buyers have to pay closing costs for taxes, lender’s fees, and title company fees. Closing costs vary by location, but you can expect to shell out between 3% and 4% of the home’s sales price. The seller pays an additional 1% to 3%. (Smart Asset and Nerdwallet have simple calculators you can use to get a rough idea of what your closing costs might be.)

When making an initial offer, you have the option to ask the seller for concessions — a settlement paid in cash to help you offset your share of the closing costs. (This move is less feasible if you’re going up against multiple offers.)

Concessions effectively lower the seller’s net proceeds from the sale. Making a counteroffer that removes the concessions you would have otherwise received at settlement puts cash back in the seller’s pocket — and can improve your bid.

#7 Pick Up the Cost of the Home Warranty

Sometimes sellers offer prospective buyers a home warranty. This is a plan that covers the cost of repairing major home appliances and systems, like the air conditioner or hot water heater, if they break down within a certain period (typically a year after closing).

A basic home warranty costs about $300 to $600 a year, according to Angie’s List. If it seems like waiving the home warranty can sweeten negotiations, but you still want the peace of mind of having one, tell the seller they don’t need to cover it — then buy it yourself.

Just keep in mind, whether you or the seller buy the warranty, you’ll need to pay the service fee (typically between $50 and $100) if something does, indeed, need to be repaired while under warranty.

Also, FYI: A home warranty is entirely separate from homeowners insurance. Homeowners insurance — the security blanket that covers your home’s structure and possessions in the event of a fire, storm, flood, or other accident — is required if you take out a mortgage. It can cost anywhere from $300 to $1,000 per year.

#8 Know When to Walk

When negotiating with a seller, trust your gut — and your agent. If he or she says a deal is bad for you: Listen.

And if you don’t want to make any more trade-offs — and the seller won’t budge — it’s smart to walk. That can be a tough decision to make, and rightfully so! Negotiating is tough. It’s draining.

And losing something you’ve worked hard to get can be disappointing. But don’t worry. There’s a better deal for you out there. And after those strong feelings of frustration pass, you’ll realize: Now I know how to do this.

Ocean City TownHome for Sale

Home for Sale

701 Rusty Anchor Rd UNIT 18,Ocean City, MD 21842

2 beds 2 baths 1,184 sqft

 FOR SALE
$224,900
Zestimate®: $230,868

EST. MORTGAGE

$940/mo

If you have always wanted to live at the ocean or have an Investment property this is it! Well cared for and beautiful 2 story townhome with 2 bedrooms 2 full baths in a very sought after area off 94th street. New siding vinyl railings and roof. Lots of storage and kitchen upgrades, including sile stone countertops, refinished cabinets and newer appliances. Master bath has a 2 person jetted tub. Large load washer & Dryer. 3 decks 2 overlooking a peaceful canal. 50 ft. away from direct bayfront to crab& Fish and view magnificent sunsets!Strong Assoc.and Basic cable is included in the condo fee. Make an appointment to see this one today this won’t last!

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THE HOME

While others buy their steamed crabs, we get ours, RIGHT OFF OUR BAY FRONT COMMUNITY BOARDWALK!!! It doesn?t get any better than that! Perfect view of fireworks, at Northside Park! Walk 50? to see magnificent sunsets! Listen to the peaceful canal! Love sitting on any of the 3 decks. Walk-In storage built onto 2 of the 3 decks. We love having crabs, on the downstairs front deck. Active Condo Association. Beautifully landscaped with bright colored flowers, maintained. Bike rack. Pet friendly. Basic cable included!

Facts and Features

Type

Single Family

Year Built

1981

Heating

Heat pump

Cooling

Central

Parking

3 spaces

Lot

No Data

Days on Zillow

147 Days

Price/sqft

$190

Saves

20

INTERIOR FEATURES

Bedrooms
  • Beds: 2
Bathrooms
  • Bathrooms Full: 2
Heating and Cooling
  • Heating: Heat pump
  • Cooling: Central
  • Heating YN: Y
Appliances
  • Appliances included: Dishwasher, Dryer, Garbage disposal, Microwave, Range / Oven, Refrigerator, Washer
  • Appliances: Stove
Flooring
  • Floor size: 1,184 sqft
  • Flooring: Carpet, Laminate, Tile
Other Interior Features
  • Fireplace
  • Ceiling Fan
  • Room count: 8
  • Storage

BUILDING

Size
  • Below Grade Fin SQFT: 0
  • Below Grade Unfin SQFT: 0
  • Above Grade Fin SQFT: 1184
Other Building Features
  • Building Name: SUNSET COVE

SPACES AND AMENITIES

Spaces
  • Jetted Tub

CONSTRUCTION

Type and Style
  • Single Family
  • Property Type: Residential
  • Architectural Style: Other
Materials
  • Roof type: Other
  • Exterior material: Vinyl
  • Construction Materials: Concrete
Dates
  • Built in 1981
Other Construction Features
  • Stories: 2

EXTERIOR FEATURES

Patio
  • Deck
  • Patio
  • Structure Type: Unit/Flat
Water
  • Waterfront
View Type
  • View: Water
Other Exterior Features
  • Parcel #: 10202795

COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOOD

Schools
  • Elementary school: Ocean City
  • Middle school: Stephen Decatur
  • High school: Stephen Decatur
  • School district: Worcester County Public Schools

PARKING

  • Parking: Off street, 3 spaces

UTILITIES

  • Cable Ready
  • Sprinkler System

FINANCE

Taxes
  • Tax Annual Amount: 2274.0
  • Tax Lot: 9135
HOA
  • HOA Fee Freq: Unknown

SOURCES

  • MLS #: 1002292274

OTHER

  • Last sold: Nov 1991 for $76,000
  • Price/sqft: $190
  • Ownership Interest: Fee Simple
  • Standard Status: Active
  • Pool: No Pool
  • Type of Parking: Off Street
  • Total SQFT Source: Assessor
  • Unit Building Type: Garden 1 – 4 Floors
  • Tax Total Finished SQFT: 1184
  • In City Limits YN: Y
  • OC Cross Street: 94
  • County Tax Pymnt Freq: Annually
  • City/Town Tax Pymnt Freq: Annually
  • City/Town Tax: 750.00
  • County Tax: 1344.00

ACTIVITY ON ZILLOW

  • Days on Zillow: 147
  • Views in the past 30 days: 2,492
  • 20 shoppers saved this home

County websiteSee data sources

How to Clean Your A/C Condensate Drain Line

REPAIR & MAINTENANCE

How to Clean Your Air Conditioner’s Condensate Drain Line

Taking the time to clean your air conditioner’s drain line (or the condensate line) can have a great positive effect on how efficiently your system runs. Here’s how to quickly and safely prevent problems with your unit.

 

If you’ve ever taken a good look at your air conditioning unit, you may have noticed a small dripping line on the outside. This is the condensate drain, which plays an important role in removing condensation produced by your air conditioner’s evaporator coil. If the line isn’t properly cleaned, algae and mold can grow inside and clog the drain, causing elevated humidity, musty odors and water damage inside your home.

Unfortunately, this part of the system is often overlooked during regular A/C maintenance. Even HVAC technicians may forget to clean the drain during a regular service call, which means that it’s up to you to check and clean the condensate pan and drain line before a problem develops. Cleaning the line will remove clogs and blockages and prevent algae and mold from growing.

Looking to purchase a home warranty plan, view:
– What is a Home Warranty
– Compare Home Warranty Coverage
– See what Home Appliances are Covered

You will need these items to clean your A/C condensate drain:

  • Rags
  • A wet/dry vacuum
  • Distilled vinegar
  • A funnel

 

How to Clean Your Air Conditioner Drain

1. Turn off the power to your HVAC system at the thermostat and at the breaker.

2. If you have an indoor air handler in your attic or utility closet, you’ll need to find the condensate pan. This is usually located directly under the unit. It may also be covered by a removable access panel.

3. If you see standing water in the drain pan, your drain line is probably clogged. Use a handheld or shop vacuum to remove the moisture. You can also use rags to soak up the water. At this point, you can clean the drain pan with soap.

4. Generally, clogged drains can be cleared with suction. If you have a shop vacuum, use it to pull the clog through the drain opening, which is located outside your house near the foundation. Place your hand around the pipe to improve suction and allow the vacuum to run for a minute. Then, check the vacuum canister to see if the clog was successfully removed.

5. Next, you’ll need to identify the access point on the drain line. Usually, the drain will have a T-shaped vent with a PVC cover. Remove the cover and inspect the drain. Use this port to flush the drain with distilled vinegar. If you don’t like the odor, you can use peroxide to gently bubble away the remaining debris. Alternately, you can use hot water and a drop of dish liquid.

6. Allow the solution to sit for 30 minutes. Complete the cleaning by flushing the pipe with water. Have a helper watch the pipe outside and tell you if the water is running freely.

If you don’t have a shop vacuum, you can use a piece of surgical tubing to free the blockage. Know that this method doesn’t work well if your drain line has sharp turns that are prone to clogs. If your system doesn’t have an access vent, use the opening on the edge of the drain pan. This fitting can be removed to improve access.

Underlying problems with the system can also be responsible for compromised water flow. If the pan and drain line aren’t slightly tilted, water can build up in the back of the pan and will eventually overflow. Many newer systems are equipped with overflow sensors installed within the pipe.

If you’re unable to clean your air conditioner’s drain line, call a local professional. They can clean the line and install an access vent, if necessary. Check the drain line periodically throughout the cooling season to ensure that condensation is being removed properly.

Routine maintenance steps like checking your drain line can help keep your air conditioner running more efficiently. If you find that your system is in need of repair, remember that an American Home Shield Home Warranty could help protect your budget from costs associated with getting your unit back on track.

9 Ways to Unclog Your Kitchen Sink Drain

REPAIR & MAINTENANCE

Don’t Call The Plumber Just Yet: 9 Ways to Unclog Your Kitchen Sink Drain

DIY home projects are great for saving money and enjoying a good challenge, but these household projects are better left for professionals.

Running water in sink

It can be a helpless feeling when the kitchen sink won’t drain. With water backing up and a counter full of dirty dishes waiting to be cleaned, it may be tempting to reach for the phone and dial the plumber. Before you do, read these easy, do-it-yourself ways to unclog that drain.

1. Boiling water

This is the easiest and least expensive solution of all, which makes it the best one to try first. Place a kettle or pot of water on the stove and bring to a rolling boil. While you’re waiting for the water to heat, remove as much standing water from the sink as you can, using a mug or small pot to bail out the water. Then, pour the entire kettle of water into the sink and wait. If the water stands in the sink and the clog doesn’t move, give the water time to cool and remove it to try again. You may need to repeat the process several times to move the clog, but this often works on many types of stoppage.

2. Disposal

Check to make sure it’s not your garbage disposal that’s causing the problem. A clogged disposal can stop up the drain, so run the disposal to see if that clears the clog. Then inspect it to make sure it’s running correctly. If the disposal has overheated, you may need to flip the switch found on the side or bottom of the unit underneath the sink.

Read more in our “Don’t Call the Plumber” series:
– How To Tackle Dishwasher Draining Issues
– How To Unclog The Shower Drain
DIY Yard Draining Solutions

3. Salt and boiling water

After removing standing water from the sink, pour about ½ cup of table salt down the drain before you pour in the boiling water. Let it sit for a few minutes, and then flush with hot water to clear the mixture.

4. Vinegar and baking soda

Again, remove standing water first. Pour about a cup or so of baking soda into the drain, followed by an equal amount of white or apple cider vinegar. The solution will bubble, but when they subside, put the stopper in and wait about 15 minutes. Next, run hot water to see if the clog clears. Repeat if needed.

5. Baking soda and salt

This is another combination that can work on sink clogs. Mix about a cup of baking soda with a half-cup of salt, and pour down the drain. Let the mixture sit for several hours, then flush with boiling water. You can repeat this process if it doesn’t work the first time.

6. Plunger

If these combinations aren’t successful in unclogging your sink, reach for a common household plunger. If you have a double sink, first seal off the second side with a wet cloth or a stopper. You’ll need to create a tight seal around the plunger, so fill the side of the sink you intend to plunge with enough water to cover the bell of the plunger. Place the plunger firmly over the drain and plunge vigorously several times. When you hear the suction clear the clog, remove the plunger and flush the drain well with warm water.

7. P-trap

It may be necessary to clean your kitchen drain’s P-trap to clear the clog. The P-trap is at the curve of the drainpipe under the sink, usually inside a cabinet. Place a pan or bucket underneath the drain to catch any water or debris that may fall out. Unfasten the P-trap from the drainpipe and clear out anything that is stuck. Then replace and run water through it.

8. Plumber’s snake

Sometimes called an auger, this handy tool can clear clogs that may be stuck further down the system. You’ll have to disassemble the drainpipe and P-trap that runs underneath the kitchen sink to expose the “stub pipe” or “stubout” that travels behind the cabinet wall. This is where you insert the snake into the pipe until you feel resistance to break up the clog.

9. Coat hanger

If you don’t have a plumber’s snake, you can use a wire coat hanger by straightening it. Of course, it won’t reach as far as a plumber’s snake would, but it may be long enough to reach some clogs. Insert it into the kitchen drain or stub pipe to push through or pull out the clog if you can reach it. Be careful not to scratch your sink with the wire.

To keep your sink smelling fresh and running clear, pour in equal parts of vinegar and baking soda on a regular basis. For routine cleaning, you’ll just need about one-half cup of each. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes before running some warm water down the drain. You can also use lemon juice for the same purpose.

Of course, it’s always easier to avoid clogs in the first place. If you have a kitchen garbage disposal, don’t overload it. Feed items in a little at a time, and wait until they grind and run through completely before adding more. Never put bacon grease, coffee grounds or oils down your kitchen drain, and always make sure you run plenty of water down the drain after each use. It’s important to know how to maintain and care for your all your home’s plumbing components and systems to keep things running smoothly.

If these methods don’t work, or if your kitchen drain clogs frequently or persistently drains slowly, it may be time to place that call to a plumbing professional.

OCMD Beach Access Made Easier with Mobi-Mat

Beach Access Made Easier for Handicapped

The Newest Addition to Ocean City Beaches

Posted: Jun 22, 2018 6:17 PMUpdated: Jun 22, 2018 6:25 PM EDT

The Newest Addition to Ocean City Beaches
Ocean City Mobi-Mat at 130th street. (Photo WBOC)Ocean City Mobi-Mat at 130th street. (Photo WBOC)

Ocean City, Md. – Introducing Mobi-Mat’s! The pilot program that was just launched on 130th and 94th street.

“We’re pretty excited and we hope these things work out for us,” City Engineer, Terry Mcgean said. “Anything that we can do to make it easier to go to the beach for everyone – we are all for.”

These one-of-a-kind Mobi-Mat’s are made out of 100% recycled polyester and they aren’t only beneficial for handicapped individuals. These mat’s are also good for families that bring large loads to the beach.

“We see a lot of families where they are towing the little red wagon behind or the cooler behind them and it makes it easier for everybody,” said Mcgean.

The mobi-mat’s are costly though, each one is roughly $7000 and that is why they will only be installed at designated handicapped areas.

This initiative goes hand in hand with the beach friendly wheelchairs that Ocean City Beach Patrol is responsible for.

“The idea is that you don’t need the Mobi-Mat for the beach wheelchairs,” said Butch Arbin, Chief of Ocean City Beach Patrol. “The beach wheelchairs are designed to roll on the sand and a regular wheelchair can go on a mobi-mat.”

The Mobi-Mat program has been successful in other resort towns and Ocean City is expecting the same.

Stress-Free Guide – Home Loans

Your Stress-Free Guide to Shopping for Home Loans

Image result for home loans images

By: HouseLogic

With this super-simple breakdown of loan types, you won’t get overwhelmed — you’ll find the right mortgage.

When it comes to buying a house, most people know what they prefer: a bungalow or a condo, a hot neighborhood or a sleepy street.

Mortgages, too, come in many styles — and recognizing which type you should choose is just slightly more involved than, say, knowing that you prefer hardwood floors over wall-to-wall carpeting.

First things first: To pick the best loan for your situation, you need to know what your situation is, exactly. Will you be staying in this home for years? Decades? Are you feeling financially comfortable? Are you anxious about changing loan rates? Consider these questions and your answers before you start talking to lenders. (And before you choose a lender, read this.)

Next: You’ll want to have an understanding of the different loans that are out there. There are lots of options, and it can get a little complicated — but you got this. Here we go.

Mortgages Are Fixed-Rate or Adjustable, and One Type Is Better for You

Let’s start with the most common type of mortgage, that workhorse of home loans — the fixed-rate mortgage.

A fixed-rate mortgage:

  • Lets you lock in an {{ start_tip 76 }}interest rate{{ end_tip }} for 15 or 30 years. (You can get 20-year loans, too.) That means your monthly payment will stay the same over the life of the loan. (That said, your property taxes and insurance premiums will likely change over time.)

It’s ideal when: You want long-term stability and plan to stay put.

Here’s what else you need to know about fixed-rate mortgages:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage offers a lower monthly payment for the loan amount (for this reason, it’s more popular than the other option, the 15-year).
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgage typically offers a lower interest rate but a higher monthly payment because you’re paying off the loan amount faster.

Now let’s get into adjustable-rate, the other type of mortgage you’ll be looking at.

An adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM):

  • Offers a lower interest rate than a fixed-rate mortgage for an initial period of time — say, five or seven years — but the rate can fluctuate after the introductory period is over, depending on changes in interest rate conditions. And that can make it difficult to budget.
  • Has caps that protect how high the rate can go.

It’s ideal when: You plan to live in a home for a short time or you expect your income to go up to offset potentially higher future rates.

Here’s what else you need to know about adjustable-rate mortgages:

  • Different lenders may offer the same initial interest rate but different rate caps. It’s important to compare rate caps when shopping around for an ARM.
  • Adjustable-rate mortgages have a reputation for being complicated. As the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau advises, make sure to read the fine print.

A general rule of thumb: When comparing adjustable-rate loans, ask the prospective lender to calculate the highest payment you may ever have to make. You don’t want any surprises.

Conventional Loan or Government Loan? Your Life Answers the Question

Which fixed-rate or adjustable-rate mortgage you qualify for introduces a whole host of other categories, and they fall under two umbrellas: conventional loans and government loans.

Conventional loans:

  • Offer some of the most competitive interest rates, which means you’ll likely pay less in interest over the period of the loan.
  • Typically you can get one more quickly than a government loan because there’s less paperwork.

Who qualifies? Typically, you need at least a credit score of 620 or above and a 5% down payment to qualify for a conventional loan.

Here’s what else you need to know about conventional loans:

  • If you put less than 20% down for a conventional loan, you’ll be required to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI), an extra monthly fee designed to mitigate the risk to the lender that a borrower could default on a loan. (PMI ranges from about 0.3% to 1.15% of your home loan.) The upshot: The lender has to cancel PMI when you reach 22% equity in your home, and you can request to have it canceled once you hit 20% equity.
  • Most conventional loans also have a maximum {{ start_tip 78 }}43% debt-to-income (DTI) ratio,{{ end_tip }} which compares how much money you owe (on student loans, credit cards, car loans, and other debts) to your income — expressed as a percentage.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac set limits on how much money you can borrow for a conventional loan. A home loan that conforms to these limits is called a conforming loan:

  • In most cities, the maximum amount for a conforming loan is $453,100.
  • In high-cost areas, such as New York City and San Francisco, the limit is $679,650.
  • Limits are revisited annually and are subject to change based on each area’s average home price.

A home loan that exceeds these limits is called a jumbo loan:

  • Jumbo loans typically require a higher down payment (up to 30% for some lenders) and a credit score of at least 720. Some borrowers can qualify while putting down 20%, but their credit score has to be higher.)
  • They also tend to have stricter debt-to-income requirements, generally allowing for a maximum DTI ratio of 38%.

There are practical considerations to take into account before getting a jumbo loan too, mainly: Are you comfortable carrying that much debt? The answer depends on your current financial situation and long-term financial goals.

Government loans:

  • Include loans secured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development.
  • Are meant to stimulate the housing market and enable folks who may be unable to qualify for conventional loans to still become homeowners.

Who qualifies? That depends on which government loan you’re looking at.

If you’ve had trouble qualifying for a mortgage because of income limitations or credit: 

FHA loans are used by a broad swath of people, including those with lower credit scores and income.

  • You can get an FHA loan with a downpayment of 3.5% if you have a minimum credit score of 580. You can still qualify with a credit score below 580 — even with no credit score — but the {{ start_tip 94 }}down payment{{ end_tip }} and other requirements will be much higher.
  • FHA loans conform to loan limits set by county; these limits typically range from $294,515 to $679,650 in high-cost areas. You can view the FHA mortgage caps for your county at hud.gov.
  • If you get an FHA loan, you must pay an upfront mortgage insurance premium (MIP) and an annual premium of 0.85%. Currently, the MIP is 1.75% of the loan amount — so, $1,750 for a $100,000 loan. This premium can be paid upfront at the mortgage closing, or it can be rolled into the monthly mortgage payment.

Also, a heads-up — the date an FHA loan was issued affects the MIP.

  • If you received an FHA loan on or before June 3, 2013: You’re eligible for canceling MIP after five years, but you must have 22% equity in your home and have made all payments on time.
  •  If you received an FHA loan after June 3, 2013: To stop paying MIP, you’d have to refinance into a conventional loan and have a current loan-to-value of at least 80%.

If you’re in the military, a veteran, or a veteran’s spouse:

  • VA loans offer active or retired military (or a veteran’s surviving spouse) a mortgage with a 0% down payment.
  • VA loans also can have more lenient credit requirements — typically around a minimum 620 credit score — and lower DTI requirements.
  • The VA only allows lenders to charge 1% maximum to cover the costs of originating and underwriting the loan, so you save money at closing. There is, however, an additional upfront, one-time funding fee of 2.15%.

VA loans also don’t charge borrowers mortgage insurance — potentially helping you save a significant chunk of cash on your monthly payment.

Given the benefits, a VA loan is often the best mortgage option for people who qualify.

If your income is limited and you live in a small or rural town:

USDA loans are mortgages for limited-income home buyers in towns with populations of 10,000 or less, or that are “rural in character,” meaning that some areas that now have bigger populations are grandfathered in. You can see whether your town is eligible on the USDA’s website.

  • USDA loans typically have lower interest rates than non-USDA loans.
  • Down payments can be as low as 0%.
  • USDA mortgages also have more lenient credit score requirements than conventional loans.
  • Income limits to qualify depend on location and household size.
  • USDA loans charge an upfront mortgage insurance fee of 1% of the loan amount and annual mortgage insurance premium of 0.35%.
  • And USDA loan borrowers must buy a “modest home” — a property with a market value deemed reasonable for the area, though the USDA does not set specific price limitations.

Only a select number of lenders offer USDA loans; here’s a list of USDA-approved lenders nationwide.

If your job is to help people:

Niche programs, like the Neighbor Next Door from HUD, allows teachers, law enforcement officers, first responders, and government workers — as much as 50% — on eligible homes in revitalization districts.

Note: Downpayment assistance programs offer qualified buyers such things as grants and interest-free loans. Start with your state’s housing finance agency to find options.

Explore More Topics:

Get Home Financing

Buy a Home: Step-by-Step

Now You Know the Basics. It’s Time to Call for Backup

Speaking of your lender: Ultimately, you’ll be working with your loan officer or broker to narrow down these choices, and to find a loan that works for you and your finances. (Just another reason why it’s important to choose a lender you’re comfortable with.)

Your real estate agent should be able to offer some insight, too. And because they don’t earn a paycheck from your loan selection, their advice about mortgages should be impartial.

You know your stuff. And you know whom to ask for help. Who’s overwhelmed? Not you.

Checklist – 6 items before closing on a home

Closing on a House Checklist: 6 Things Home Buyers Must Do Before They Move In

 | Jun 11, 2018

Welcome to your Closing on a House Checklist—a rundown of everything home buyers need to do in the 11th hour before they get their hands on those keys. Because when you’re approaching the finish line in your home-buying journey, you want nothing to go wrong, right?

That’s why we’ve put together a home closing checklist, which outlines your action points in those few days leading up to settlement. Keep this list handy to know you’ve done what you need to in order to close the deal.

1. Get all contingencies squared away

Most purchase agreements have contingencies—things that buyers must do before this transaction is official, explains Jimmy Branham, a real estate agent at the Keyes Company, in Fort Lauderdale, FL. These are the most common contingencies:

  • Home inspection contingency: This gives buyers the right to have the home professionally inspected. If something is wrong, you can request it be fixedor you can back out of the sale. Its rarely advisable to waive an inspection contingency. Although the average home inspection costs $300 to $500, its a drop in the bucket considering the costly home issues you might uncover, says Claude McGavic, executive director of the National Association of Home Inspectors.
  • Appraisal contingency: With this contingency, a third party hired by your mortgage lender evaluates the fair market value of the home. If the appraised value is less than the sale price, the contingency enables you to back out of the deal without forfeiting your earnest money deposit, says Bishoi Nageh, president of the Petra Cephas Team at Mortgage Network Solutions, in Somerset, NJ.
  • Financing contingency: This contingency gives you the right to back out of the deal if your mortgage approval falls through. You have a specified time period, as stated in the sales contract, during which you have to obtain a loan that will cover the mortgage.

2. Clear the title

When you buy a home, you “take title” to the property and establish legal ownership—a process that’s confirmed by local public land records. As part of the closing process, your mortgage lender will require a title search, and you’ll need to purchase title insurance to protect you from legal claims to the house.

Sometimes distant relatives—or an ex-spouse—may surface with a claim that they actually own the home, and that the seller had no right to sell it to you in the first place. But clearing title will ensure this doesn’t happen, says Marc Israel, president and chief counsel of MIT National Land Services, a title company in New York City.

As the home buyer, you’re entitled to choose the title company. You can get recommendations from your real estate agent, mortgage lender, and friends—just be sure to check out the license and reputation of each company online.

3. Get final mortgage approval

Before you can go to the closing table, your home loan must go through the underwriting process. Underwriters are like real estate detectives—it’s their job to make sure you have represented yourself and your finances truthfully, and that you haven’t made any false or misleading claims on your loan application.

The underwriter—employed by your mortgage lender—will check your credit score, review your home appraisal, and ensure your financial portfolio has remained the same since you were pre-approved for the loan.

Since underwriting typically happens shortly before closing, you don’t want to do anything while you’re in contract that’s going to hurt your credit score. That includes buying a car, boat, or any other large purchase that has to be financed.

4. Review your closing disclosure

If you’re getting a loan, one of the best ways to prepare is to thoroughly review your closing disclosure, also known as a HUD-1 settlement statement. This official document outlines your exact mortgage payments, the loan’s terms (e.g., the interest rate and duration), and additional fees you’ll pay, called closing costs (which total anywhere from 2% to 7% of your home’s price).

You’ll want to compare your closing disclosure to the loan estimate your lender gave you at the outset. If you spot any discrepancies, ask your lender to explain them.

5. Do a final walk-through

Most sales contracts allow buyers to do a walk-through of the homewithin 24 hours before closing. During this stage, you’re making sure the previous owner has vacated (unless you’ve allowed a rent-back arrangement in which they can stick around for a period of time before moving). You’re also double-checking that the home is in the condition agreed upon in the contract. If your home inspection revealed problems that the sellers had agreed to fix, you’ll want to make sure those repairs were made.

6. Bring the necessary documentation to closing

Make sure you have the following items when you head to the closing table:

  • Proof of homeowners insurance
  • A copy of your contract with the seller
  • Your home inspection reports
  • Any paperwork the bank required to approve your loan
  • A government-issued photo ID (Note to newlyweds who just changed their name: The ID needs to match the name that will appear on the propertys title and mortgage.)

Plan to sign a ton of paperwork. An attorney or settlement agent will guide you through the process. When you’re done, you’ll collect the keys and you’re finally home free!

Daniel Bortz is a Realtor in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, DC. He has written for Money magazine, Entrepreneur magazine, CNNMoney, and more.

4th of July Fireworks in MD DE VA

4th of July

Maryland

 

  • Snow Hill: Saturday, July 1, 5:30- 9:15 p.m.; Food and activities at Sturgis Memorial Park on River Street. Fireworks begin at dusk, which will be at around 9:15 p.m. Neon glow sticks, necklaces and bracelets will be sold. For more information call 410-632-2080.

 

 

 

  • Crisfield: Saturday, July 1, 5-10 p.m.; Somers Cove Marina. A family event with food, arts and crafts, a military veteran slideshow, patriotic music, kids activities, games on the beach, and finally, a fireworks display at 9:15 p.m. Admission is free, but it is recommended that you bring your own lawn chair. For more information call 410-968-2500.

 

 

 

  • St. Michaels: Saturday, July 1, 7-10 p.m.Fireworks and Big Band Night at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. Admission: $10 for non-members and $6 for members and member guests. Admission falls to $2 after 8:45 p.m. Rain date: Sunday, July 2. For more information call 410-745-2916.

 

 

 

  • Centreville: Sunday, July 2, 9:15 p.m. at Queen Anne’s County High School bus loop

 

 

 

  • Berlin: Monday, July 3, 9:15-9:30 p.m.; Berlin Falls Park on Old Ocean City Boulevard. 

 

 

 

  • Oxford: Monday, July 3, Dusk; Tred Avon Yacht Club.

 

 

 

  • Rock Hall: Monday, July 3, 9 p.m. Rain date: Wednesday, July 5.

 

 

 

  • Cambridge: Tuesday, July 4, Dusk; Choptank River Waterfront. Best viewing spots include Great Marsh Park and Long Wharf Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Chestertown: Tuesday, July 4, Dusk; Chester River Waterfront. Wilmer Park is a good viewing spot for the event. In case of rain, fireworks are delayed until there is a break in the weather.  There is no rain date.

 

 

 

  • Easton: Tuesday, July 4, 4-10 p.m.; Easton Carnival & 4th of July Celebration. St. Michaels Road and Waterside Drive (behind Target). Fireworks show begins at dusk.

 

 

 

  • Hebron: Wednesday, July 5, 9:30 p.m..; Hebron Carnival Grounds.

 

 

 

  • Ocean City: Tuesday, July 4; Concert and Fireworks on the Beach. Concert at 8 p.m. followed by fireworks at 9:30 p.m.; Downtown on the beach at North Division Street AND uptown at Northside Park on 125th Street. For more information, call 1-800-626-2326 or the Ocean City Department of Recreation & Parks at 410-250-0125.

 

 

 

  • Ocean Pines: Tuesday, July 4, 9 p.m.; Showell Park, 11281 Racetrack Road. Recommended viewing locations are Showell Elementary School, the Community Church at Ocean Pines, Most Blessed Sacrament School and The Pavilions.  Rain date: Wednesday, July 5. For more information call 410-641-7717.

 

 

 

  • Salisbury: Tuesday, July 4, 9:15 p.m.Red, White and BOOM Fireworks Show at Wicomico County Stadium across from the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center.

 

 

 

  • Salisbury: Tuesday, July 4. Fireworks at Arthur W. Perdue Stadium following the 6:05 p.m. Delmarva Shorebirds game.

 

 
 
 
 
Delaware

 

  • Millsboro: Saturday, July 1, 6-10 p.m.; Cupola Park. Fireworks at dusk.

 

 

 

  • Cape May-Lewes Ferry: Sunday, July 2Fireworks Cruise. Cruise departs Lewes at 7:15 p.m.. Fireworks will illuminate the skies over the Delaware Bay. Return to Lewes at 11 p.m. For more information go here. For reservations call 1-800-643-3779.

 

 

 

  • Rehoboth Beach: Sunday, July 2, 9:15 p.m. Fireworks will be launched from the beach and will be visible up and down the boardwalk and beach. Live entertainment before and after fireworks at the Bandstand. Depending on the weather, the fireworks may launch any time after 8 p.m.

 

 

 

  • Bethany Beach: Tuesday, July 4.  Fireworks at dusk and are best viewed from the beach or boardwalk.

 

 

 

  • Dewey Beach: Tuesday, July 4, 9 p.m. North beach Restaurant, McKinley Street on the Bay.

 

 

 

  • Dover: Tuesday, July 4, 9:20 p.m.; Legislative Hall. Tours, food and more from 9 a.m.- 10 p.m.. For a full list of activities, click here.

 

 

 

  • Laurel: Tuesday, July 4, 8 a.m.: Prayer breakfast at Abbott’s on Broad Creek; 5 p.m.: The Band Chain Break will perform in Market Square Park Bandstand; 6 p.m.: Little Miss Independence Pageant; 7 p.m.: Parade will begin. “Let Freedom Ring” is the theme this year; 8 p.m. until fireworks: Band Chain Break will continue to perform; 9:25 p.m.: fireworks will begin.

 

 

 

  • Middletown: Tuesday, July 4, 6-9 p.m. Fireworks display at dusk/dark at Silver Lake Park. No personal fireworks, dogs, open flames, allowed in the park. Rain date July 5.

 

 

 

  • Milton: Tuesday, July 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Family-friendly patriotic celebration in Milton Memorial Park. A highlight of the festivities is the bike decorating contest and bike parade at 11 a.m. Grand prizes of two brand new bikes will be awarded to the winners – one each to the best boy and girl entries.   All decorated bike contestants must register by 10:45 a.m. at Irish Eyes Restaurant and Pub in Milton on the back patio. Other festivities include a dunk tank, a cake walk and free games and activities for children. Children will enjoy train rides, relay and sack races and a variety of competitions including the “Chess Tent” where children can develop their chess skills and play matches. The “Milton’s Best” Pie Baking Contest has three competitive categories – professional, amateur, and children 12 and under.  Bring your favorite Red, White or Blue themed pie to the Hospitality Tent between 9 and 10 a.m. All pies must be homemade, have a red, white or blue filling and not require refrigeration.  Prizes and certificates will be awarded to the winners. Musical entertainment at the gazebo will feature Milton’s own Walt Hetfield known for his Buddy Holly Tribute. His group will perform patriotic songs and Americana 1950’s rock and roll. DJ Jerry B, from Affordable Wedding Entertainment, will also keep the music flowing. Bring a picnic lunch or purchase food from on-site vendors.

 

 

 

  • Newark: Tuesday, July 4, 6-10 p.m. Live musical entertainment begins at 6 p.m. Fine arts and crafts booths are available to browse and games abound for the kids. Fireworks begin at dusk at University of Delaware’s David M. Nelson Athletic Complex on South College Avenue at Del. 896 (near Delaware Stadium). Rain date July 5, fireworks only.

 

 

 

  • Smyrna:  Tuesday, July 4.  Parade and fireworks. Parade will start at 9:30 a.m., on South Street and end at Smyrna Municipal Park. Park anywhere between there. Fireworks will be held at dusk at the Little League fields, with parking available at Smyrna High and Smyrna Middle schools.

 

 
 
Virginia
 

 

  • Cape Charles: Tuesday, July 4, Festivities begin at 8 a.m. and will take place along Bay Avenue with a parade at 10 a.m. Fireworks after dark at the harbor/beach. Rate date July 5, fireworks only.

 

 

 

  • Chincoteague Island: Saturday, July 1; Chincoteague Carnival Grounds. Fireworks to begin at 10 p.m..Carnival open from 7-11 p.m. Click here for more information.

 

 
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